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  • 10th Annual NYC Anarchist Book Fair

    Saturday, April 16, 11am-7pm

    Judson Memorial Church
    55 Washington Square South
    New York, NY 10012

    Come celebrate the 10th anniversary of the NYC Anarchist Book Fair on Sat., April 16, 2016 at the Judson Memorial Church. The book fair will bring publishers, designers, writers, artists, musicians, and activists from all over North America to this historic location in Greenwich Village—the neighborhood that is one of the birthplaces of the anarchist movement in the US. 

    The NYC Anarchist Book Fair is free to the public. It provides a safe space for activists to meet and organize and where the anarcho-curious can get informed about a movement against capitalism and the state that is central to many of the most important political and cultural currents of our time. Besides exhibits by anarchist publishers, artisans, and organizers, the book fair will feature panels and workshops on a wide range of topics, from anarchist history, theory, and politics to economics, culture, social movements, and art.

    The NYC Anarchist Arts Festival and the NYC Anarchist Film Festival, will be held in conjunction with the book fair. For the first time this year we'll also have a anarchist music night. 

    More information: www.anarchistbookfair.net

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  • 5th Annual Carrboro Anarchist Book Fair (Nov. 22, 2014)

    On Our Own Authority! will be tabling at the 2014 Carrboro Anarchist Book Fair. We are very excited to be participating again this year. Events will be held on Saturday, 22 November 2014, at The Nightlight Bar and Internationalist Books in Chapel Hill, North Carolina. Check out the postcard below for more information, or visit http://carrboroanarchistbookfair.wordpress.com/ 

    See you there!

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  • TO REMAIN SILENT IS IMPOSSIBLE: Emma Goldman & Alexander Berkman In Russia

    on Square Market

    Emma Goldman and Alexander Berkman, the Russian Jewish immigrants who were once called “the two most notorious anarchists in the United States” by the New York Times, were the most outstanding revolutionary activists of their generation. Arrested in 1917 for their anti-conscription campaign during the First World War, they were subsequently deported to Russia in the 1919-1920 Red Scare.

    Although they were initially optimistic about returning to Russia in the midst of social revolution, over the next two years Goldman and Berkman would come face-to-face with the contradictions of “the dictatorship of the proletariat” as they witnessed the persecution of Russian anarchists, the suppression of revolutionary labor movements, and the brutal annihilation of the 1921 Kronstadt Uprising.

    The two anarchists learned from experience that the Bolshevik dictatorship was not the embodiment of the workers’ revolution that it claimed to be, but was in fact “the very antithesis of revolution.” Their first-hand accounts of the situation in Russia reminded revolutionaries everywhere that “the state - whatever its name or form - is ever the mortal enemy of liberty and popular self-determination” and that true social revolution can never be managed or manipulated by political parties seeking state power, but must emerge from the creative self-activity of working people themselves.

    This new volume collects selected writings by Emma Goldman and Alexander Berkman that recount their experiences in Russia from 1920 to 1922. Famous essays like “Bolsheviks Shooting Anarchists,” “The Prisons of Russia,” and “There Is No Communism in Russia” are collected here alongside immortal pamphlets like The Crushing of the Russian RevolutionThe Russian Tragedy, and The Kronstadt Rebellion. Selections from Emma Goldman’s memoir, My Disillusionment in Russia, are also included, as well as many other documents and manuscripts.

    Order your copy at the link above!

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  • JEAN VIGO AND THE ANARCHIST EYE by David Weir

    "Decades ahead of his time, the film artist Jean Vigo was a one-man nouvelle vague. He was also a visionary who grasped cinema’s potential for embodying his political ideas—as demonstrated by David Weir in his acute and detailed appreciation of Vigo’s multi-faceted oeuvre, the best such to appear in English."

    — J. Hoberman, author of Film After Film.

    on Square Market

    The son of Miguel Almereyda, an anarchist activist who died in prison, Jean Vigo kept faith with the politics of his father through his art. One of the most influential filmmakers in cinema history, Vigo gave aesthetic expression to anarchist ideology in four films: the city symphony À propos de Nice (1930), the sports documentary Taris ou la natation (1931), the medium-length Zéro de conduite (1933), and the feature-length L’Atalante (1934), currently ranked by the British Film Institute as the twelfth greatest film of all time. Although his career was cut short by tuberculosis at the age of 29, Jean Vigo continues to be one of the most commanding figures in the history of cinema.

    In this book, David Weir examines Vigo’s cinematic career in both the political and the cultural context of the interwar period in European history, taking stock of the ideological upheavals of the 1930s that plunged the continent into the horrors of fascism and war. Weir also explores Vigo’s relationship to other filmmakers of the period, such as Luis Buñuel, Jean Renoir, and Marcel Carné—all of whom, like Vigo, range across the leftist spectrum of the interwar years. In the end, Weir argues that, whereas L’Atalante and the other films have been mostly restored to something like their original condition, more work needs to be done to restore the original ideological meaning of those films.

    Jean Vigo and the Anarchist Eye is NOW AVAILABLE from our online bookstore! Order your copy today at the link above!

    DAVID WEIR is professor of comparative literature at the Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art. He is the author of Decadence and the Making of Modernism (1995), James Joyce and the Art of Mediation (1996), Anarchy and Culture: The Aesthetic Politics of Modernism (1997), Brahma in the West: William Blake and the Oriental Renaissance (2003), Decadent Culture in the United States: Art and Literature against the American Grain, 1890–1926 (2007), and American Orient: Imagining the East from the Colonial Era through the Twentieth Century (2011).

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